I’ve been thinking I’d like to write more about the books I read. (I read a lot of books.) 
So, in addition to “stuff Nicole writes,” we’re going to do “stuff Nicole reads.”
Last week I read Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Bread Crumbs. Anna Quindlen is one of my very favorite authors, in part because she writes about worlds that are very familiar to me, and in part because nearly all of her books are about women trying to answer the question how should someone live?
Still Life With Bread Crumbs was not my favorite Anna Quindlen book; Every Last One, One True Thing, and Rise and Shine, which are my favorites, all have more depth and heft to them, and Still Life felt a bit more casual and loosely drawn.
However, it was a familiar look into small-town life, and it made me happy while I read it, which is one of the best compliments you can give a book.
Also, it had a mystery that I didn’t solve until right before the characters did, so full marks for that.
Totally read it, if you’re looking for a comfortable, female-centered story set in rural New England.
(Full disclosure: all the Amazon links are affiliate links because of course they are.)

I’ve been thinking I’d like to write more about the books I read. (I read a lot of books.) 

So, in addition to “stuff Nicole writes,” we’re going to do “stuff Nicole reads.”

Last week I read Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Bread Crumbs. Anna Quindlen is one of my very favorite authors, in part because she writes about worlds that are very familiar to me, and in part because nearly all of her books are about women trying to answer the question how should someone live?

Still Life With Bread Crumbs was not my favorite Anna Quindlen book; Every Last One, One True Thing, and Rise and Shine, which are my favorites, all have more depth and heft to them, and Still Life felt a bit more casual and loosely drawn.

However, it was a familiar look into small-town life, and it made me happy while I read it, which is one of the best compliments you can give a book.

Also, it had a mystery that I didn’t solve until right before the characters did, so full marks for that.

Totally read it, if you’re looking for a comfortable, female-centered story set in rural New England.

(Full disclosure: all the Amazon links are affiliate links because of course they are.)

stunningpicture:

It’s all a matter of perspective

OTHER SIDE OF MAP SEE MIRROR

stunningpicture:

It’s all a matter of perspective

OTHER SIDE OF MAP SEE MIRROR

(via dedalvs)

So I just pre-ordered John Scalzi’s Lock In.

A little over a week ago, I was sitting on a bus station bench having just had a long-term relationship end. (We’re both good people, neither of us wronged the other, and it was the right thing for both of us even though it was hard.)

A few friends were sitting with me as we waited for the bus to take me back home. In previous breakup situations I might have said “That jerk!” or “It’s so unfair!” but in this case nobody was a jerk, and nobody was unfair.

So instead, with tears trawling down my face, I filled the silence with the first thing that came to mind: 

"I’m so excited about Scalzi’s new book" — sniff — "I think it’s going to be a little more hard sci-fi than Redshirts was” — tears — “I read the first chapters on Tor and they were excellent” — Kleenex time — “it really brings up some interesting questions about humanity and you should totally read it.”

Thinking of this now makes me smile. Thinking of the whole relationship, including its ending, makes me feel good, like we did it the right way.

And yes, I am very excited to read Lock In.

river-b:

motherfuckinoedipus:

abnels:

memeguy-com:

You win this round cheese

actually that is a rectangle cheese

[oxford comma laughing in the distance]

[vocative comma wondering what oxford comma thinks it’s doing here]

river-b:

motherfuckinoedipus:

abnels:

memeguy-com:

You win this round cheese

actually that is a rectangle cheese

[oxford comma laughing in the distance]

[vocative comma wondering what oxford comma thinks it’s doing here]

(via molly23)

What apps have y’all used for tracking business expenses?

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’

Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014

Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly

Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz

Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis

Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba

Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi

Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

(via seananmcguire)

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Nicole Dieker. Freelance copywriter. Essayist (The Toast, Yearbook Office, Boing Boing, The Billfold). Occasional nerd musician. Every week I post how much money I earn writing.

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